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What should we learn from the walls of Jericho falling down?

walls of Jericho

Question: "What should we learn from the walls of Jericho falling down?"

Answer:
The story of the walls of Jericho falling down, recorded in Joshua 6:1-27, is one that vividly demonstrates the miraculous power of God. But more than that, the utter destruction of Jericho teaches us several grand truths regarding God’s grace and our salvation.

The people of Israel had just crossed over the Jordan River into the land of Canaan (Joshua 3:14-17). This was the land of milk and honey God had promised to Abraham over 500 years earlier (Deuteronomy 6:3, 32:49). After spending forty difficult years wandering in the desert of Sinai, the people of Israel were now on the eastern banks of the Jordan. Their challenge: take the land of Canaan, the Promised Land. However, their first obstacle was the city of Jericho (Joshua 6:1), an unconquerable walled city. Excavations there reveal that its fortifications featured a stone wall 11 feet high and 14 feet wide. At its top was a smooth stone slope, angling upward at 35 degrees for 35 feet, where it joined massive stone walls that towered even higher. It was virtually impregnable.

In ancient warfare such cities were either taken by assault or surrounded and the people starved into submission. Its invaders might try to weaken the stone walls with fire or by tunneling, or they might simply heap up a mountain of earth to serve as a ramp. Each of these methods of assault took weeks or months, and the attacking force usually suffered heavy losses. However, the strategy to conquer the city of Jericho was unique in two ways. First, the strategy was laid out by God Himself, and, secondly, the strategy was a seemingly foolish plan. God simply told Joshua to have the people to march silently around Jericho for six days, and then after seven circuits on the seventh day to shout.

Though it seemed foolish, Joshua followed God’s instructions to the letter. When the people did finally shout, the massive walls collapsed instantly, and Israel won an easy victory. In fact, God had given the city of Jericho to them before they even began to march around its walls (Joshua 6:2, 16). It was when the people of God, by faith, followed the commands of God that the walls of Jericho fell down (Joshua 6:20).

The apostle Paul assures us: “For everything that was written in the past was written to teach us, so that through endurance and the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have hope” (Romans 15:4). The description of the complete obliteration of Jericho was recorded in Scripture in order to teach us several lessons. Most important is that obedience, even when God's commands seem foolish, brings victory. When we are faced with seemingly insurmountable odds, we must learn that our Jericho victories are won only when our faithful obedience to God is complete (Hebrews 5:9; 1 John 2:3, 5:3).

There are other key lessons we should learn from this story. First, there is a vast difference between God’s way and the way of man (Isaiah 55:8-9). Though militarily it was irrational to assault Jericho in the manner it was done, we must never question God’s purpose or instructions. We must have faith that God is who He says He is, and will do what He says He will do (Hebrews 10:23, 11:1).

Second, the power of God is supernatural, beyond our comprehension (Psalm 18:13-15; Daniel 4:35; Job 38:4-6). The walls of Jericho fell and they fell instantly. The walls collapsed by the sheer power of God.

Third, there is an uncompromising relationship between the grace of God and our faith and obedience to Him. As the Hebrew writer tells us: “By faith the walls of Jericho fell, after the people had marched around them for seven days” (Hebrews 11:30). Although their faith had frequently failed in the past, in this instance the children of Israel believed and trusted God and His promises. As they were saved by faith, so we are today saved by faith (Romans 5:1; John 3:16-18). Yet faith must be evidenced by obedience. As with the children of Israel, the walls of Jericho fell “by faith” after they were circled for seven straight days. As such, saving faith impels us to obey God (Matthew 7:24-29; Hebrews 5:8-9; 1 John 2:3-5).

In addition, the story tells us that God keeps His promises (Joshua 6:2, 20). The walls of Jericho fell because God said they would. God’s promises to us today are just as certain. They are just as unswerving. They are exceedingly great and wonderfully precious (Hebrews 6:11-18, 10:36; Colossians 3:24).

Finally we should learn that faith without works is dead (James 2:26). It is not enough to say, "I believe God," and then live in an ungodly manner. If we truly believe God, our desire is to obey God. Our faith is put to work. We make every effort to do exactly what God says and keep His commandments. Joshua and the Israelites carried out the commands of God and conquered Jericho. God gave them victory over an enemy that was trying to keep them out of the Promised Land. So it is with us today: if we have true faith, we are compelled to obey God, and God gives us victory over the enemies that we face throughout life. Obedience is the clear evidence of faith. Our faith is the evidence to others that we truly believe in Him. We can conquer and be victorious through life by faith, a faith that obeys the God who gives us that faith as a free gift (Ephesians 2:8-9).

Recommended Resources: Joshua: Holman Old Testament Commentary by Kenneth Gangel.
Joshua, New American Commentary by David Howard and Logos Bible Software.


Related Topics:

Why did Joshua curse Jericho in Joshua 6:26?

Is it true that the sun stood still?

Why did God judge the sin of Achan so severely?

Who was the commander of the army of the LORD in Joshua 5:14?

Why did the Israelite spies visit the house of Rahab the prostitute?



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What should we learn from the walls of Jericho falling down?